Palm Sunday Homily:

“Jesus Releases Us from the Prison of Sin.”

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Pastor's Corner

Holy Week
In two weeks, our Lenten journey will reach its climax as we enter into Holy Week (29 March-4 April) and the celebration of the deepest mysteries of our faith.
On Palm Sunday, we will remember how Jesus entered into Jerusalem to the crowd cheering, “Hosanna!”, only to hear it shout, “Crucify him!” less than a week later.
On Holy Thursday night, we will enter into the mystery of the Lord’s Supper. In imitation of Jesus, I will wash feet, and we will feast on his Life in the Eucharist, which he instituted, along with the priesthood, on that first Holy Thursday. This beautiful liturgy concludes with the procession of the Blessed Sacrament around the church to the
tabernacle, where the Eucharist is kept until 10:00pm for the Gethsemane watch, when we can stay and pray with Jesus for an hour (as the Apostles failed to do in the garden).

Divine Mercy Sunday

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Today’s Event’s

Divine Mercy

Divine Mercy Sunday

 

Sunday, April 12th, 2015

Divine Mercy Sunday Services At Saint Mary’s Church

17 Waterville Street, North Grafton

2:00 PM – 4:00 PM

 

Sacrament of Reconciliation / Confessions Available

Benediction and Reposition of the Blessed Sacrament

 

For additional information contact:

St. Mary’s Parish Office at 508-839-3993

 

 

 

 

Holy Week

The Sacred Triduum

 

Holy Thursday

7:00 –  Evening Mass of the Lord’s Supper

“So when he had washed their feet [and] put his garments back on and reclined at table again, he said to them, ‘Do you realize what I have done for you? You call me ‘teacher’ and ‘master,’ and rightly so, for indeed I am. If I, therefore, the master and teacher, have washed your feet, you ought to wash one another’s feet. I have given you a model to follow, so that as I have done for you, you should also do,’” (John 13: 12-15).

Today’s Gospel reading models what Christian love looks like. Jesus bends down and washes the feet of his disciples, commanding them to do the same for others. In the washing of feet and the sacrament of the Eucharist, we see “the same mystery of a divine expression of love.” Both show Jesus humbly lowering down, meeting us where we are, and offering an expression of love.

In a recent address, Pope Francis said: “There is much that we can do to benefit the poor, the needy and those who suffer, and to favor justice, promote reconciliation and build peace. But before all else we need to keep alive in our world the thirst for the absolute, and to counter the dominance of a one-dimensional vision of the human person, a vision which reduces human beings to what they produce and to what they consume: this is one of the most insidious temptations of our time.”[1][2][3][4]

Written by Sarah Ciotti
Reviewed by Fr. Hugh Feiss, OSB, STD
[1] Excerpts from the Lectionary for Mass for Use in the Dioceses of the United States of America, second typical edition © 2001, 1998, 1997, 1986, 1970 Confraternity of Christian Doctrine, Inc., Washington, DC. Used with permission. All rights reserved.
[2] Adrien Nocent, The Liturgical Year: Volume Two (Collegeville, MN: Liturgical Press, 2014), 159-174.
[3] John Paul II, Homily, April 17, 2003.
[4] Francis I, Address, March 20, 2013.

Good Friday

12:00 – Ecumenical Stations of the Cross

3:00 – Stations of the Cross

7:00 – Friday of the Passion of the Lord

“See, my servant shall prosper, he shall be raised high and greatly exalted…Though harshly treated, he submitted and did not open his mouth; Like a lamb led to slaughter or a sheep silent before shearers, he did not open his mouth…But it was the Lord’s will to crush him with pain. By making his life as a reparation offering, he shall see his offspring, shall lengthen his days, and the Lord’s will shall be accomplished through him,” (Isaiah 52:13, 53:7,10).

Today is Good Friday. A spirit of glory marks this day against a backdrop of death and suffering. The fourth and final Suffering Servant song, cited above, prefigures Christ’s death, burial and resurrection. The Servant breaks the hold of sin and death with silence, gentleness, and vulnerability. This is Yahweh’s will for his Servant and his will for his people.

Pope Francis spelled out the implications for this in a recent general audience: “Holy Week challenges us to step outside ourselves so as to attend to the needs of others: those who long for a sympathetic ear, those in need of comfort or help. We should not simply remain in our own secure world, that of the ninety-nine sheep who never strayed from the fold, but we should go out, with Christ, in search of the one lost sheep, however far it may have wandered. Holy Week is not so much a time of sorrow, but rather a time to enter into Christ’s way of thinking and acting. It is a time of grace given us by the Lord so that we can move beyond a dull or mechanical way of living our faith, and instead open the doors of our hearts, our lives, our parishes, our movements or associations, going out in search of others so as to bring them the light and the joy of our faith in Christ.”[1][2][3][4]

Written by Sarah Ciotti
Reviewed by Fr. Hugh Feiss, OSB, STD
[1] Excerpts from the Lectionary for Mass for Use in the Dioceses of the United States of America, second typical edition © 2001, 1998, 1997, 1986, 1970 Confraternity of Christian Doctrine, Inc., Washington, DC. Used with permission. All rights reserved.
[2] Adrian Nocent, OSB, The Easter Season (Collegeville, MN: Liturgical Press, 1977), 64-93.
[3] Walter Brueggemann, Isaiah 40-66 (Louisville: Westminster John Knox Press, 1998) 141-150.
[4] Francis I, General Audience, March 27, 2013.

Holy Saturday

7:30 – Easter Vigil in the Holy Night of Easter

“What is happening? Today there is a great silence over the earth, a great silence, and stillness, a great silence because the King sleeps; the earth was in terror and was still, because God slept in the flesh and raised up those who were sleeping from the ages. God has died in the flesh, and the underworld has trembled.”

Holy Saturday is a day of silence, rest, and prayer. Today God is concealed, which creates a divine pause, stilling our hearts. Today, as the Church waits for the return of the Servant, there are no liturgical celebrations until the Easter Vigil Mass. As the people of God, we are asked to enter into Christ’s rest, a form of self-emptying. As Pope Francis said, “Holy Week is not so much a time of sorrow, but rather a time to enter into Christ’s way of thinking and acting. It is a time of grace given us by the Lord so that we can move beyond a dull or mechanical way of living our faith, and instead open the doors of our hearts.”[1][2][3]

Written by Sarah Ciotti
Reviewed by Fr. Hugh Feiss, OSB, STD
[1] Unknown, The Lord’s Descent into Hell, ed Pontifical University Saint Thomas Aquinas, Vatican.va.
[2] Francis I, March 27, 2013.
[3] Adrian Nocent, OSB, The Liturgical Year: Lent & Holy Week (Collegeville, MN: Liturgical Press, 1977), 94-98.